One Person Killed Every Seven Minutes as Syria Death Toll Nears 200,000

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Aug. 22, 2014 – At least 191,369 people were killed in the Syria conflict from March 2011 to April 2014, according to a new report commissioned by the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

That corresponds to about eight people killed every hour for the 1,095 days covered in the report or one person every seven minutes.

The report is the first update from the UN since June last year when it reported that at least 92,901 people had been killed between March 2011 and April 2013. The latest study says that was an undercount and new data has recorded 116,046 deaths in the first two years as a result of the conflict.

The research for the OHCHR was conducted by the Human Rights Data Analysis Group using five sources: 1. the Syrian Government 2. the Syrian Center for Statistics and Research 3. the Syrian Network for Human Rights 4. the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights 5. the Violations Documentation Centre.

“The total 191 369 can be understood as a minimum bound of the number of killings between March 2011 and April 2014,” the report states.

85.1 percent are male victims, 9.3 percent are female victims, and 5.6 percent of records do not indicate the sex of the victim.

“The majority of records (83.8 percent) lack information about the age of victims, which makes it impossible to draw conclusions about the distribution of violence over age categories,” the report says. “Of the records that do include age information, 2,165 indicate victims 0-9 years old, and 6,638 victims 10-18 years old.”

The highest number of documented killings was recorded in the Governorate of Rural Damascus (39,393), next highest was Aleppo (31,932), Homs (28,186), Idlib (20,040), Daraa (18,539) and Hama (14,690).

In a statement accompanying the release of the report, UN human rights commissioner Navi Pillay lambasted the Security Council for its failure to hold accountable the perpetrators.

“The killers, destroyers and torturers in Syria have been empowered and emboldened by the international paralysis,” she said. “There are serious allegations that war crimes and crimes against humanity have been committed time and time again with total impunity, yet the Security Council has failed to refer the case of Syria to the International Criminal Court, where it clearly belongs.”

– Denis Fitzgerald
On Twitter @denisfitz

Photo/ICRC

UN Human Rights Office Welcomes Supreme Court Decision on Death Penalty

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May 30, 2014 – The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on Friday called on US authorities to put a moratorium on executions following a Supreme Court ruling on the death penalty and people with intellectual disabilities.

The Court on Tuesday struck down Florida’s requirement that defendants facing execution show an IQ test score of 70 or below before being permitted to submit additional evidence regarding their intellectual disability.

In a 5-4 ruling the majority stated in the case of Freddie Lee Hall, a man with an IQ of 71 who killed a pregnant newlywed in 1978, that “intellectual disability is a condition, not a number.”

“The ruling will affect not only Florida, which is the state with the second-largest number of people on death row after California, but also other states that still use the death penalty in the US,” Navi Pillay’s office said on Friday. ” Judges will now be required to take a less mechanical approach to mental disability in capital cases.”

There are currently 32 US states where the death penalty is on the books. So far in 2014, there have been 20 executions in five states.

Worldwide, some 93 countries still retain the death penalty but 49 of these countries have not applied it in the past ten years.

A UN General Assembly resolution in December 2012 calling on Member States to establish moratoria on executions “with a view to abolishing the death penalty” passed with 111 states in favor, 41 against and 39 abstentions.

– Denis Fitzgerald
On Twitter @denisfitz

Image/Wikimedia